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5 comments / Posted on by Hassan Mawji

Fashion and Dawah...
did you raise a brow?

Don't worry, I'm sure many others will too. Especially when the topic is regarding hijab in the context of fashion.

But more than trying to understand how it might be a positive thing, many of us fall into heated debates, arguments and discussions surrounding whether or not hijab should be fashionable.

Whatever your opinion is on this issue…

great. Hold onto it.

We're not asking you to change your stance, because this isn't about to be a discussion surrounding what's halal or what's haram. But what we are asking is for you to shift your lenses and see things from a different point of view.

What if our fashion-taste and how we beautifully draped our georgette hijabs was what peaked certain people's curiosity of Islam? What if our hijab-to-outfit color coordination and our impeccable taste in fabric drew people closer to the religion? What if, the way we carried ourselves through our combination of modesty and unique sense of style indirectly acted as a form of dawah?

You would be surprised at the number of non-Muslim folks who walk into Muslim clothing stores, like Verona Collection, and ask a plethora of questions regarding the hijab and the deen...all because of what they see we're wearing.

"What is that scarf you're wearing around your head called?"

"Oh it's called hee-jab. Why do you have to wear it?"

"It's so beautiful, can anybody wear it or just Muslims?"

And sometimes, we even get silly comments about how great our English speaking skills are or how we sound like a proper American. And instead of being insulted, it's just better to laugh it off because of how grossly inaccurate the portrayal of Muslim women in hijab is in popular media.

So really, there is no such thing as a silly question or comment. The greater the scale of ridiculousness a question or comment is on, the greater responsibility we have in addressing it. And that's also why CAIR awarded Verona Collection with the "2016 Muslim Innovation Award" for the innovative approach of sparking dialogue, without really speaking at all. CAIR acknowledged how Verona Collection proudly distinguishes themselves as more than a clothing store and how through fashion and modesty, is able to stand out as a respectable organization in which many individuals can associate a positive image of Muslim women and Islam with.

But to summarize, the fashion industry in the United States alone is a multi-billion-dollar industry. How people dress now days is more than just about what they're wearing, it's about what they stand for. So why shouldn't Muslims strut into that sector and dominate that realm by introducing fashion that is in compliance with our deen?

How cool is it to take western fashion ideologies that suggest that 'sex sells' and do the complete opposite by selling clothing items that teach the highest regard for modesty in our religion? And finally, think of the reward for bringing someone into Islam simply because what you wore caught their eye?

It's truly a miracle all the different ways people are introduced to or enter into the religion of Islam. Some picked up a Quran after all the hate Muslims received after 9/11. Others converted after having mentally-stimulating conversations with Muslims regarding spirituality, life and faith. And then there are those. Those who saw the beauty in the religion, simply because they saw the beauty on the people who followed it.

And when a man came to the Prophet PBUH and asked him if it was too arrogant or prideful of one to wear good clothes and look nice. The Prophet PBUH eloquently stated that “Allah is beautiful and loves beauty. Pride means to renounce the truth and to abase people.” [Sahih Muslim]

Fashion isn't our enemy. If we harness it right all while being in accordance with Islam, it can be one of the best and most beautiful acts of dawah the world has ever seen.

 By: Nashiha Pervin 

Fashion and Dawah...
did you raise a brow?

Don't worry, I'm sure many others will too. Especially when the topic is regarding hijab in the context of fashion.

But more than trying to understand how it might be a positive thing, many of us fall into heated debates, arguments and discussions surrounding whether or not hijab should be fashionable.

Whatever your opinion is on this issue…

great. Hold onto it.

We're not asking you to change your stance, because this isn't about to be a discussion surrounding what's halal or what's haram. But what we are asking is for you to shift your lenses and see things from a different point of view.

What if our fashion-taste and how we beautifully draped our georgette hijabs was what peaked certain people's curiosity of Islam? What if our hijab-to-outfit color coordination and our impeccable taste in fabric drew people closer to the religion? What if, the way we carried ourselves through our combination of modesty and unique sense of style indirectly acted as a form of dawah?

You would be surprised at the number of non-Muslim folks who walk into Muslim clothing stores, like Verona Collection, and ask a plethora of questions regarding the hijab and the deen...all because of what they see we're wearing.

"What is that scarf you're wearing around your head called?"

"Oh it's called hee-jab. Why do you have to wear it?"

"It's so beautiful, can anybody wear it or just Muslims?"

And sometimes, we even get silly comments about how great our English speaking skills are or how we sound like a proper American. And instead of being insulted, it's just better to laugh it off because of how grossly inaccurate the portrayal of Muslim women in hijab is in popular media.

So really, there is no such thing as a silly question or comment. The greater the scale of ridiculousness a question or comment is on, the greater responsibility we have in addressing it. And that's also why CAIR awarded Verona Collection with the "2016 Muslim Innovation Award" for the innovative approach of sparking dialogue, without really speaking at all. CAIR acknowledged how Verona Collection proudly distinguishes themselves as more than a clothing store and how through fashion and modesty, is able to stand out as a respectable organization in which many individuals can associate a positive image of Muslim women and Islam with.

But to summarize, the fashion industry in the United States alone is a multi-billion-dollar industry. How people dress now days is more than just about what they're wearing, it's about what they stand for. So why shouldn't Muslims strut into that sector and dominate that realm by introducing fashion that is in compliance with our deen?

How cool is it to take western fashion ideologies that suggest that 'sex sells' and do the complete opposite by selling clothing items that teach the highest regard for modesty in our religion? And finally, think of the reward for bringing someone into Islam simply because what you wore caught their eye?

It's truly a miracle all the different ways people are introduced to or enter into the religion of Islam. Some picked up a Quran after all the hate Muslims received after 9/11. Others converted after having mentally-stimulating conversations with Muslims regarding spirituality, life and faith. And then there are those. Those who saw the beauty in the religion, simply because they saw the beauty on the people who followed it.

And when a man came to the Prophet PBUH and asked him if it was too arrogant or prideful of one to wear good clothes and look nice. The Prophet PBUH eloquently stated that “Allah is beautiful and loves beauty. Pride means to renounce the truth and to abase people.” [Sahih Muslim]

Fashion isn't our enemy. If we harness it right all while being in accordance with Islam, it can be one of the best and most beautiful acts of dawah the world has ever seen.

 By: Nashiha Pervin 

5 comments

  • Posted on by Al-Nour Min Muhammad

    I have been surculathing around this topic that has been put down to read right here for quit some time…

    I’m sure many ladies been brought up in Islamic mindset and value, must be aware were the origins lie if it comes to Hi(d)jab. It’s not just a word in Arabic transformed into mainstream slang, it’s not just something that stems out of pré-Islamic Culture with a big C, it’s not just a Persian and Jewish custom that seemed mergeable, adoptable and applicable…

    People got lost on this subject, many of times over and over again, but one must not forget it’s origin and what Muhammad intentions were when asking for this as an application for Women back in the days.

    When modesty didn’t have a stamp upon many (women), women did dress revealing or exposing, that’s true, Jewish women had their modesty values that had already been layed down by Rabbinical Law. Everything you can basically find in the Talmud today… It’s referred to as Tzniut, today it’s a bit different from Jews back in Medina and in the time of the Muhammad ofcourse, why? Because when many look similar on this basics of modesty for women part, you can’t stand apart any longer in your Religious and Culture statement in society…

    The main headdress like for men in the time of the temple used to be a turban like headdress. But not the long and extended version you can see in Islamic Hidjab and Niqab styles or even in the Persian Chador… Let’s go back to what Muhammad suggested and requested in the name of Allah…

    → (translated in an applicable way for people): … To draw from what is around your necks until over your bossem, so that men will lower their gazes whenever you pass them by… A common style of modesty was already present, see Jilbab without any head covering ofcourse…

    Now, when you fuse the one with the other, you are heading to a fully geared up lady that should pass the time when perps were going about to find them some victim or marriage material without the permission from daddy…

    hmmm… but there was a thing that slaves needed to distinguish themselves from their slave masters as well? What to do… First the slave ladies wore headscarfs but then the new convert Muslimahs were exposed and harassed by many men, so, they switched things up…

    Muhammad got inspired by Rabbinical Law, by Persian influences of royal women and so on… this had to be the best solution and a Godly one in essence to… for the sake of women, for the sake of Muslimahs of society back then when Muslims were being persecuted throughout Arabia…

    You should know that in Pré-Islamic times there was something called Hidjab, it was a black curtain, better screen that would separate ALL NON RELATIVE BY BLOOD MEN from the woman in general when the husband wasn’t present or was so that their was no gazing, glancing or any other exiting event that could take place just because… of her being visible to the naked eye of a strange man…

    NOW!

    Fashion? MIpsters, Hipsters, Fashionistas, Muslim sisters… and so on…

    If you combine Fashion of the west, inspired by America and Europe, one goal label and consume, slave work and digits, slaves to fashion, filling in the definition of a woman by the west adopted by Muslimahs…

    I don’t know but somethings off…

    For me there was only and there is still only one perfect SUFI WOMAN, her name was RABIA AL-ADAWIYYAH (SAW)… this is the perfect example for all you Muslimahs that are convinced that fashion and Islamic modesty are to be fused to one since Allah likes what is beautyfull in the eye of the beholder called a mortal!

    Rabia (SAW) she used a rock as a pillow!!!??!!

    And you… ladies are almost bursting out in a fit to see what color of Hidjab would fit your LV bag? …

    I can tell you that when that aspect will continue to dominate Islamic mainstream thought for youth (girls), it will destroy Islam in the near future…

    I always believed that it was about modesty, soberty and a non materialism and attachment point of view to fulfill God’s Commandments and not the ones of your own hearts or not the ones that are been set and created by other people…

    If The West created pop culture, that includes fashion wear, that defines how and what a woman should be like in presentation in mental state, in verbal acting out, stance, face, look, hair …. and you add that when the Persians ruled , when high and mighty folk ruled with Arab or Persian blood, multiple layers, long and extended clothing, were all a sigh of wealth and power???!!!! and you are doing the same… whom are you following, I mean seriously… GOD? ALLAH?…. or your own desires and hearts wishes…

    Muhammad highlighted many aspects that could serve best as a focus point for women in general so that indeed their status would be lifted… but when you only focus on the outer world, layer of your false self, you loose all spiritual merit….

    I am not here to BASH simply point out the facts and when one strays from the path, one falls deep and high heels will knot get you back up!

    Peace!

  • Posted on by loveallahfirst
    I love how this article is focused more on making hijab a source of Dawah through the elegance and modesty with beauty that it portrays. I’m all for the wearing nice hijabs with elegant modest clothing that is loose and not too fitted because as Muslim women that is who we are. I do believe that the makeup and “bling” is sometimes overdone and unnecessary to the idea of modesty. I believe that as Muslims,we should look nice and elegant but at the same time modest. The elegance is what should appeal to the eye in terms of Dawah because it lacks extreme tightness, or skin-exposure. It is the fact that we are defining fashion in a new light – one of modesty, self-worth, and cover – rather than the exposing more that makes Islamic fashion spectacular. I think this is what attracts the inner, pure soul and what Islamic fashion should aim to achieve – clothes that are not revealing, tight or overly bling-bling, but clothes that are loose, elegant, covering and modest.
  • Posted on by Naseeha

    Allah is beautiful and loves beauty. But he also commanded us women to be modest and not draw attention to this beauty outside our homes (as he commanded men to lower their gaze). Saying we should beautify ourselves in hijab to draw attention to Islam is a poor dawah appeal and is not rooted in Islam. It is up to Allah to guide and up to us to do as we are instructed. It is not only women that become interested in our beauty but men too…and this leads to temptation and sin. I am all for wearing nice clean clothes but not overdo it on the fashion statement and the makeup….that’s drawing attention; the opposite of modesty and hayaa.

  • Posted on by Salma

    Love this article mashaAllah :)

  • Posted on by Shazia

    Assalam Alykoum Sister,
    Very well said.
    I fully agree with you.

    Also I love the way you are wearing your hijab on that photo.
    Can you make a tutorial of it on the Verona youtube channel please?

    May Allah Bless you and your loved ones.
    Shazia

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